05
Jan

Pollan’s Food Rules: Food marketers and their agencies, as well as food eaters, should have a copy in their libraries



Michael Pollan’s newest book cuts through the polemics of the food and sustainability debates by distilling healthy food practices down to a manual of simple and easy to understand guidelines. Engendered in equal parts by his own research and input from the public (notably through responses to his call for rules to New York Times readers published in the NYT Magazine Food Issue) these 64 rules range from the commonsense (#2 Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother would not recognize as food) to the sublime (#13 Eat only foods that will eventually rot).

While an important read for anybody who eats, it should also be a required reference for any food marketer that wants to target the urban, upper middle-class buyer, as these rules, or some variation of them, are already starting to inform buying behavior, particularly on the coasts, and this trend will only continue as part and parcel of the sustainability and health debates.

I don’t agree (granted I am biased) with Pollan’s implicit assertion that the very act of packaging and marketing is a damning symptom of non-foodness. But I do agree with many of the communication cues he identifies (#9 Avoid food products with the wordoid “lite” or the terms “low-fat” and “nonfat” in their names) and think this little book is a great thought starter for marketers and their agencies on how to better and more powerfully communicate the true value their products offer.
http://www.michaelpollan.com/

One Response to “Pollan’s Food Rules: Food marketers and their agencies, as well as food eaters, should have a copy in their libraries”

  1. pushmepullyou says:

    Just bought this book and love the way it is structured. Considered and flexible without too much dogmatism (a little maybe). Some interesting ideas for marketing.